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  • Explorer Hop meets Ontario curriculum requirements
  • Explorer Hop meets British curriculum requirements
  • Explorer Hop meets IB curriculum requirements
  • Explorer Hop meets Singapore curriculum requirements
  • Explorer Hop meets BC curriculum requirements

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In this very interactive and enriching program, you will take a math journey into a very comprehensive and easy to understand math program. At the end you will not only have excellent knowledge about the subject, you will also ace your exams but will also be able to apply and use your math knowledge everyday.

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What you get in the Program

Our innovative program simulates a real trading environment

  • Easy to understand modules

    Our programs are designed to be easy to understand and take you step by step through the learning process. You can work at own pace. We use fun graphics, videos, quizzes, worksheets (and lots of games) to help you become a pro.

  • Discussion Zone

    Want to discuss a math concept or even an idea of how to use math? We have built-in discussion zones enabled for each chapter. Have a question? We're here to help! Wondering about something? Ask away!

  • Quizzes & Projects

    While you learn, practice your skills with hands-on activities, quizzes and fun projects to apply what you learned in real-life scenarios. Share these on social and inspire others!

This Course Includes

  • Interactive Video Lessons

  • Quizzes and Assignments

  • Downloadable Resources

  • Full Lifetime Access

  • Certificate of completion

Course curriculum

  • 01

    Registration

    • Registration Information

    • Required Student Information

  • 03

    Chapter 1: Characteristics of Functions

    • Lesson 1: How can we represent a relation between two variables? (graphs, table of values, equtaion, etc)

    • Quiz: Lesson 1

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 1

    • Worksheet: Lesson 1

    • Lesson 2: Review: Set notation and interval notation

    • Quiz: Lesson 2

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 2

    • Worksheet: Lesson 2

    • Lesson 3: Review: Function vs. Relation (including one-to-one and vertical line test)

    • Quiz: Lesson 3

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 3

    • Worksheet: Lesson 3

    • Lesson 4: Review: Linear Equations (use function notation, tables, equations)

    • Quiz: Lesson 4

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 4

    • Worksheet: Lesson 4

    • Lesson 5: Finding the slope (Given two points AND finding the slope given a point and y intercept)

    • Quiz: Lesson 5

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 5

    • Worksheet: Lesson 5

    • Worksheet: Lessons 1-5

    • Lesson 6: interpret and use any of the forms y = mx + b, y – y1 = m(x – x1), ax + by + c = 0 in solving problems

    • Quiz: Lesson 6

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 6

    • Worksheet: Lesson 6

    • Lesson 7: Represent quadratic functions (using function notation, tables, equations)

    • Quiz: Lesson 7

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 7

    • Worksheet: Lesson 7

    • Lesson 8: Identify the three forms of equations of quadratic functions: standard, factored, vertex

    • Quiz: Lesson 8

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 8

    • Worksheet: Lesson 8

    • Lesson 9: Review: Converting from standard form to factored form (with and without coefficients)

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 9

    • Worksheet: Lesson 9

    • Lesson 10: Review: Converting from standard form to vertex form (completing the square)

    • Quiz: Lesson 10

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 10

    • Worksheet: Lesson 10

    • Worksheet: Lesson 6-10

    • Lesson 11: Describe features of quadratic functions such as degree, shape, concavity, intercepts, vertex, optimal value, and axis of symmetry, given the graph

    • Quiz: Lesson 11

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 11

    • Worksheet: Lesson 11

    • Lesson 12: Sketching the graphs of quadratic functions: y= (x - p)^2 + q y= - (x - p)^2 + q y= (x - a) (x - b) y= - (x - a) (x - b)

    • Quiz: Lesson 12

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 12

    • Worksheet: Lesson 12

    • Lesson 13: Determine the number of zeros (i.e., x-intercepts) of a quadratic function, using a variety of strategies (e.g., inspecting graphs; factoring; calculating the discriminant)

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 13

    • Worksheet: Lesson 13

    • Lesson 14: Find the exact coordinates of the vertex of a quadratic function (in any form) using an appropriate algebraic method or technology

    • Quiz: Lesson 14

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 14

    • Worksheet: Lesson 14

    • Lesson 15: Determine the algebraic representation of a quadratic function, given the real roots of the corresponding quadratic equation and a point on the function

    • Quiz: Lesson 15

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 15

    • Worksheet: Lesson 15

    • Worksheet: Lessons 11-15

    • Lesson 16: Find the y intercept of quadratic functions algebraically

    • Quiz: Lesson 16

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 16

    • Worksheet: Lesson 16

    • Lesson 17: Solve quadratic inequalities

    • Quiz: Lesson 17

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 17

    • Worksheet: Lesson 17

    • Lesson 18: Make connections between the equations and graphs of quadratic functions: use the roles played by the parameters a, c, and d in transformed quadratic functions to describe features of the graph, given the equation

    • Quiz: Lesson 18

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 18

    • Worksheet: Lesson 18

    • Lesson 19: Solve problems involving quadratic functions arising from real-world applications and represented using function notation

    • Quiz: Lesson 19

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 19

    • Worksheet: Lesson 19

    • Lesson 20: Solve linear and quadratic equations algebraically

    • Quiz: Lesson 20

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 20

    • Worksheet: Lesson 16-20

    • Worksheet: Lesson 20

    • Lesson 21: Solve by substitution a pair of simultaneous equations of which one is linear and one is quadratic

    • Quiz: Lesson 21

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 21

    • Lesson 22: Solve real-life problems involving the intersection of a linear function and a quadratic function graphically and algebraically

    • Quiz: Lesson 22

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 22

    • Lesson 23: Finding the point of intersection of two quadratics

    • Quiz: Lesson 23

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 23

    • Lesson 24: Review: graphs of f(x) = |x| , f(x) = √x, and f(x) = 1/x

    • Worksheet: Lesson 21-24

    • Quiz: Lesson 24/25

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 24/25

    • Lesson 26: Revision of mathematical vocabulary and terms: function, domain, range, one-one function, inverse function and composition of functions

    • Quiz: Lesson 26

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 26

    • Lesson 27: Understand the meaning of |x|, sketch the graph of y = |ax + b| and use relations such as |a| = |b| ⇔ a 2 = b2 and |x – a| < b ⇔ a – b < x < a + b when solving equations and inequalities

    • Quiz: Lesson 27

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 27

    • Lesson 28: Find the inverse of a one-on-one function in simple cases

    • Quiz: Lesson 28

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 28

    • Lesson 29: Determining numeric or graphical representations of the inverse of a linear or quadratic function and make connections (e.g., the graph of the inverse is the reflection of the graph of the function in the line y = x)

    • Quiz: Lesson 29

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 29

    • Lesson 30: Comparing the domain and range of a function and its inverse function

    • Quiz: Lesson 30

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 30

    • Lesson 31: The roles of the parameters a, k, d, and c in functions of the form y = af(k(x – d)) + c

    • Quiz: Lesson 31

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 31

    • Lesson 32: Continue on from previous lesson

    • Quiz: Lesson 32

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 32

    • Lesson 33: Sketch graphs of y = af(k(x – d)) + c by applying one or more transformations to the graphs of f(x) = x, f(x) = x , f(x) = √x, and 1/x and state the domain and range of the transformed functions (continue into next lesson)

    • Quiz: Lesson 33

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 33

    • Game Time! Put the images in the correct sequence

    • Lesson 34: Draw graphs of piecewise functions

    • Quiz: Lesson 34

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 34

  • 04

    Chapter 2: Polynomials and Rational Functions

    • Lesson 1: Simplifying polynomial expressions by adding and subtracting

    • Quiz: Lesson 1

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 1

    • Worksheet: Lesson 1

    • Lesson 2: Simplifying polynomial expressions by multiplying and dividing

    • Quiz: Lesson 2

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 2

    • Worksheet: Lesson 2

    • Lesson 2A: Division of polynomials

    • Quiz: Lesson 2A

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 2A

    • Worksheet: Lesson 2A

    • Lesson 3: Determine if two given algebraic expressions are equivalent (i.e., by simplifying; by substituting values)

    • Quiz: Lesson 3

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 3

    • Worksheet: Lesson 3

    • Lesson 4: Exploration and understanding that √ab = √a x √b, a ≥ 0, b ≥ 0

    • Quiz: Lesson 4

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 4

    • Worksheet: Lesson 4

    • Lesson 5: Stating restrictions on rational expressions

    • Quiz: Lesson 5

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 5

    • Worksheet: Lesson 5

    • Lesson 6: Adding and subtracting rational expressions

    • Quiz: Lesson 6

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 6

    • Worksheet: Lesson 6

    • Lesson 7: Multiplying rational expressions

    • Quiz: Lesson 7

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 7

    • Worksheet: Lesson 7

    • Lesson 8: Partial fraction decomposition [for the trickier examples in the video, include examples where this ends up being the denominator: (ax + b)(cx + d)(ex + f) as well as this as the denominator: (ax + b)(cx + d)^2 and this: (ax + b)(cx^2 + d) ]

    • Quiz: Lesson 8

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 8

    • Game Time! Memory Game

    • Worksheet: Lesson 8

  • 05

    Chapter 3: Exponential Functions

    • Lesson 1: Graphing an exponential relation given its equation in the form y = bˣ (b > 0, b ≠ 1) (In the lesson, define this relation as the function f(x) = bˣ and explain why it is a function)

    • Quiz: Lesson 1/2

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 1/2

    • Worksheet: Lesson 1/2

    • Lesson 3: Determining the value of a power with a rational exponent

    • Quiz: Lesson 3

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 3

    • Worksheet: Lesson 3

    • Lesson 4: Connections between the value of the base and the shape of the graph

    • Quiz: Lesson 4

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 4

    • Worksheet: Lesson 4

    • Lesson 5: Converting from exponent form to radical form

    • Quiz: Lesson 5

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 5

    • Worksheet: Lesson 5

    • Lesson 6: Simplifying and evaluating expressions with negative exponents

    • Quiz: Lesson 6

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 6

    • Worksheet: Lesson 6

    • Lesson 7: Simplifying algebraic expressions containing integer and rational exponents

    • Quiz: Lesson 7

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 7

    • Worksheet: Lesson 7

    • Lesson 8: Evaluating numeric expressions containing integer and rational exponents and rational bases

    • Quiz: Lesson 8

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 8

    • Worksheet: Lesson 8

    • Lesson 9: Determining and describing key properties relating to an exponential graph's domain and range, intercepts, increasing/decreasing intervals, asymptotes, end behaviour

    • Quiz: Lesson 9

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 9

    • Worksheet: Lesson 9

    • Lesson 10: The graph of y = e^kx for both positive and negative values of k

    • Quiz: Lesson 10

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 10

    • Lesson 11: Distinguishing exponential functions from linear and quadratic functions by making comparisons in a variety of ways

    • Quiz: Lesson 11

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 11

    • Lesson 12: Determining (using technology, can use desmos or GDC) the roles of the parameters a, k, d, and c in functions of the form y = af(k(x – d)) + c, and describing these roles in terms of transformations on the graph of f(x) = b^x (b > 0, b ≠ 1)

    • Quiz: Lesson 12

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 12

    • Lesson 13: Sketching graphs of y = af(k(x – d)) + c by applying one or more transformations to the graph of f(x) = a (a > 0, a ≠ 1), and state the domain and range of the transformed functions

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 13

    • Lesson 14: State the domain and range of various exponential graphs (parent function and transformed functions)

    • Quiz: Lesson 14

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 14

    • Lesson 15: Determining (using technology, can use desmos or GDC) that the equation of a given exponential function can be expressed using different bases

    • Quiz: Lesson 15

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 15

    • Worksheet: Lesson 15

    • Lesson 16: Solving exponential equations by expressing both sides of the equation as single powers of the same base and then equating the exponents

    • Quiz: Lesson 16

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 16

    • Worksheet: Lesson 16

    • Lesson 17: Solving exponential equations using a graph

    • Quiz: Lesson 17

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 17

    • Worksheet: Lesson 17

    • Lesson 18: Representing an exponential function with an equation, given its graph or its properties

    • Quiz: Lesson 18

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 18

    • Game Time! Flip and Learn

    • Worksheet: Lesson 18

    • Lesson 19: Collecting and analyzing data that can be modelled as an exponential function (with and without technology) from primary sources and graph the data

    • Quiz: Lesson 19

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 19

    • Worksheet: Lesson 19

    • Lesson 20: Identifying exponential functions, including those that arise from real-world applications involving growth and decay given various representations

    • Quiz: Lesson 20

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 20

    • Worksheet: Lesson 20

    • Lesson 21: Solving problems using given graphs or equations of exponential functions arising from a variety of real-world applications

    • Quiz: Lesson 21

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 21

    • Worksheet: Lesson 21

  • 06

    Chapter 4: Discrete Functions

    • Lesson 1: Review: Discrete functions vs. continuous functions

    • Quiz: Lesson 1

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 1

    • Worksheet: Lesson 1

    • Lesson 2: Review and identify sequence as arithmetic, geometric or neither, given a numeric or algebraic representation

    • Quiz: Lesson 2

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 2

    • Worksheet: Lesson 2

    • Lesson 3: Represent sequences using function notation

    • Quiz: Lesson 3

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 3

    • Worksheet: Lesson 3

    • Lesson 4: Generating sequences given the intial terms

    • Quiz: Lesson 4

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 4

    • Worksheet: Lesson 4

    • Lesson 5: Represent a sequence algebraically using a recursion formula

    • Quiz: Lesson 5

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 5

    • Worksheet: Lessonn 5

    • Lesson 6: Determine recursive patterns in the Fibonacci sequence and Pascal's triangle

    • Quiz: Lesson 6

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 6

    • Worksheet: Lesson 6

    • Lesson 7: Explore the relationship between pascal's triangle and expansion of binomials

    • Quiz: Lesson 7

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 7

    • Worksheet: Lesson 7

    • Lesson 8: Binomial Expansion: expansion of (1 + x) ^ n , where n is a rational number and |x| < 1

    • Quiz: Lesson 8

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 8

    • Worksheet: Lesson 8

    • Lesson 9: Determine the formula for the general term of an arithmetic sequence or geometric sequence

    • Quiz: Lesson 9

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 9

    • Worksheet: Lesson 9

    • Quiz: Lesson 9/10

    • Worksheet: Lesson 9/10

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 9/10

    • Lesson 11: Determine the formula for the sum of an arithmetic or geometric series and apply the formula to calculate the sum of a given number of consecutive terms

    • Quiz: Lesson 11/12

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 11/12

    • Worksheet: Lesson 11/12

    • Lesson 13: Review: Sequences vs. Series

    • Quiz: Lesson 13

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 13

    • Worksheet: Lesson 13

    • Lesson 14: Expand and evaluate a series written in sigma notation; Express a series using sigma notation

    • Lesson 15: Arithmetic and Geometric Progressions

    • Quiz: Lesson 14/15

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 14/15

    • Worksheet: Lesson 14/15

    • Lesson 16: Use the formulae for the nth term and for the sum of the first n terms to solve problems involving arithmetic or geometric progressions

    • Quiz: Lesson 16

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 16

    • Worksheet: Lesson 16

    • Lesson 17: Using the condition for the convergence of a geometric progression, and the formula for the sum to infinity of a convergent geometric progression.

    • Quiz: Lesson 17

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 17

    • Worksheet: Lesson 17

    • Lesson 18: Making connections between arithmetic sequences, simple interest, and linear growth

    • Quiz: Lesson 18/19

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 18/19

    • Worksheet: Lesson 18/19

    • Lesson 20: Introduce the calculation of the amount, A, the principal, P, or the interest rate per compounding period, i, using the compound interest formula in the form A = A = P(1 + i) [or FV = PV(1 + i)]

    • Quiz: Lesson 20/21

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 20/21

    • Game Time! Crossword

    • Worksheet: Lesson 20/21

  • 07

    Chapter 5: Trigonometric Functions

    • Lesson 1: Labeling sides of a right triangle hypotenuse, opposite, and adjacent

    • Quiz: Lesson 1

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 1

    • Worksheet: Lesson 1

    • Lesson 2: Drawing angles in standard position and recognizing coterminal angles

    • Quiz: Lesson 2

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 2

    • Worksheet: Lesson 2

    • Lesson 3: Drawing and determining the size of the principle angle and of the related acute angle

    • Quiz: Lesson 3

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 3

    • Worksheet: Lesson 3

    • Lesson 4: Understanding the concept of the unit circle and how to use it

    • Quiz: Lesson 4

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 4

    • Worksheet: Lesson 4

    • Lesson 5: Using the x, y, r definitions to find the principal angle, given a point on the terminal arm

    • Quiz: Lesson 5

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 5

    • Worksheet: Lesson 5

    • Lesson 5A: Determining the measures of two angles from 0º to 360º for which the value of a given trigonometric ratio is the same

    • Quiz: Lesson 5A

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 5A

    • Worksheet: Lesson 5A

    • Lesson 6: Calculating the primary and reciprocal trigonometric ratios given two sides of a right triangle

    • Quiz: Lesson 6

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 6

    • Worksheet: Lesson 6

    • Lesson 7: Relating complementary trigonometric ratios

    • Quiz: Lesson 7

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 7

    • Worksheet: Lesson 7

    • Lesson 8: Using trig ratios to find missing angles and sides in right angle triangles

    • Quiz: Lesson 8

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 8

    • Worksheet: Lesson 8

    • Lesson 9: Using SOHCAHTOA to solve real-world problems

    • Quiz: Lesson 9

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 9

    • Worksheet: Lesson 9

    • Lesson 10: Radians and arc length

    • Quiz: Lesson 10

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 10

    • Worksheet: Lesson 10

    • Lesson 11: Converting from radians to degrees and from degrees to radians

    • Quiz: Lesson 11

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 11

    • Lesson 12: Using trigonometry to find: the area of a sector

    • Lesson 13: Using trigonometry to find: the area of a segment

    • Quiz: Lesson 12/13

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 12/13

    • Lesson 18: Proving simple trigonometric identities, using the Pythagorean identity sin x + cos x = 1

    • Quiz: Lesson 14-18

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 14-18

    • Lesson 19: Using the sine law to find the angles and sides in oblique triangles

    • Quiz: Lesson 19

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 19

    • Lesson 20: Using the cosine law to find the angles and sides in oblique triangles

    • Quiz: Lesson 20

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 20

    • Lesson 21: Problems involving right triangles and oblique triangles in two dimensional settings, and solve these problems using the primary trigonometric ratios, the cosine law, and the sine law (including the ambiguous case)

    • Quiz: Lesson 21

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 21

    • Worksheet: Lesson 21

    • Lesson 22: Problems involving right triangles and oblique triangles in three-dimensional settings, and solve these problems using the primary trigonometric ratios, the cosine law, and the sine law

    • Quiz: Lesson 22

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 22

    • Worksheet: Lesson 22

    • Lesson 23: Recognizing conditions of the ambiguous case of the sine law

    • Lesson 24: Drawing diagrams and finding missing sides and angles for the two possibilities of the ambiguous case

    • Quiz: Lesson 23/24

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 23/24

    • Worksheet: Lesson 23/24

    • Lesson 25: Describing key properties (e.g., cycle, amplitude, period) of periodic functions arising from real-world applications given a numeric or graphical representation

    • Quiz: Lesson 25

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 25

    • Worksheet: Lesson 25

    • Lesson 26: Predicting by extrapolating, the future behaviour of a relationship modelled using a numeric or graphical representation of a periodic function

    • Quiz: Lesson 26

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 26

    • Worksheet: Lesson 26

    • Lesson 27: Making connections between the sine ratio and the sine function and between the cosine ratio and the cosine function with or without technology

    • Quiz: Lesson 27

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 27

    • Quiz: Lesson 27/28

    • Lesson 29: Sketching the graphs of f(x) =sinx and f(x) =cosx for angle measures expressed in degrees

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 27/28

    • Quiz: Lesson 29

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 29

    • Lesson 30A: Trigonometric Functions: Determining and describing their key properties (i.e., cycle, domain, range, and intercepts) (Continuation of previous lesson)

    • Lesson 30B: Determining and describing their key properties (i.e., amplitude, period, maximum and minimum values, increasing/decreasing intervals and phase shift) (Continuation of previous lesson)

    • Quiz: Lesson 30

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 30

    • Lesson 31: Determining the roles of the parameters a, k, d, and c in functions of the form y =af(k(x – d)) + c, where f(x) =sinx or f(x) =cosx with angles expressed in degrees using technology

    • Quiz: Lesson 31

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 31

    • Lesson 32: Describing the roles in terms of transformations on the graphs of f(x) =sinx and f(x) =cosx (Continuation of previous lesson)

    • Quiz: Lesson 32

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 32

    • Lesson 33: Determining the amplitude, period, phase shift, domain, and range of sinusoidal functions whose equations are given in the form f(x) = asin(k(x – d)) + c or f(x) = acos(k(x – d)) + c

    • Quiz: Lesson 33

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 33

    • Lesson 34: Sketching graphs of y = af(k(x – d)) + c by applying one or more transformations to the graphs of f(x) =sinx and f(x) =cosx, and state the domain and range of the transformed functions

    • Quiz: Lesson 34

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 34

    • Lesson 35: Representing a sinusoidal function with an equation, given its graph or its properties

    • Quiz: Lesson 35

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 35

    • Lesson 36: Collecting data that can be modelled as a sinusoidal function with and without technology, from primary sources, using a variety of tools and graph the data

    • Quiz: Lesson 36

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 36

    • Lesson 37: Identifying periodic and sinusoidal functions, including those that arise from real-world applications involving periodic phenomena, given various representations

    • Quiz: Lesson 37

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 37

    • Lesson 38: Explaining any restrictions that the real-world context places on the domain and range

    • Quiz: Lesson 38

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 38

    • Lesson 39: Determining how sinusoidal functions can be used to model periodic phenomena that do not involve angles

    • Quiz: Lesson 39

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 39

    • Worksheet: Lesson 39

    • Lesson 40: Predicting the effects on a mathematical model of an application involving periodic phenomena when the conditions in the application are varied

    • Quiz: Lesson 40

    • Mini Challenge: Lesson 40

    • Game Time! Drag and Drop

    • Worksheet: Lesson 40

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Frequently Asked Questions

Here are answers to some common questions we are asked

  • What grade is this level for?

    This level is designed for kids ages 11-12 in Grades 6 and 7.

  • Is there any in-person teaching?

    Our programs have been designed to be completely self learn. No personal instruction is included at this time. We also do not think it is necessary to add personal instruction or tutors to our program.

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    Within 1 business day after you submit your project your will get 2 notifications. The first notification will let you know if your project has been approved, or not approved. The second notification will be an email from our team of instructors giving you comments on the project.

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    Worksheets are provided with the answer key. They range from easy to intermediate to hard questions and are designed for you to be able to complete it on your own.

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    It doesn't matter what curriculum you followed, we have surpassed it! Our program includes all aspects of the following curriculums: Canada (Ontario & BC), British Curriculum, International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced Placement (AP) and Singapore National Curriculum.

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